Martin Caraher: Food banks as indicators of the new ‘Tory’ style poor law

As Christmas approaches, we are reblogging Martin Caraher’s thoughtful argument that foodbanks are a symbol of our society’s failure to hold government accountable for hunger, food insecurity and poverty.

wakeupscotland

The hijacking of food poverty by politicians … seems at best misjudged and at worst a form of political shenanigans. Surely we should be raging against the increased need for food banks and the injustice that drive many of our fellow citizens to use them. 

Martin Caraher, Professor of food and health policy at the Centre for Food Policy, City University, London, examines the complex issues of food poverty, food banks and public attitudes. 

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Martin Caraher: Food banks as indicators of the new ‘Tory’ style poor law

The hijacking of food poverty by politicians … seems at best misjudged and at worst a form of political shenanigans. Surely we should be raging against the increased need for food banks and the injustice that drive many of our fellow citizens to use them. 

Martin Caraher, Professor of food and health policy at the Centre for Food Policy, City University, London, examines the complex issues of food poverty, food banks and public attitudes.  (more…)

Jacobites and Jacobins: the problem with Yes fundamentalism

The most read article on this website is the one by Ewan Morrison ‘Yes: Why I joined Yes and why I changed to No’. It is interesting to see that some Yesses are now voicing their criticism of the Yes movement and some of this echoes what Ewan was saying in his article. So we thought it would be worthwhile reblogging an extremely thoughtful blog which appeared on the faintdamnation website. In this piece the author explains his unease with various aspects of the Yes movement such as the Glasgow rally and the way that the SNP and many Yes activists are content to discard the view of the majority of Scots. He particularly dislikes ‘the tone’ of many of their pronouncements and wonders if he still wants to be part of movement which he believes has ‘authoritarian’ tendencies.

Faint damnation

It all seemed so positive at the time.

In the run-up to the referendum, many, many thousands of people took the time to educate themselves, and each other, about how we in Scotland are governed. Information came to light about taxation flows, media coverage, oil revenues, voting records, expenses payments. Everywhere, people were interested in politics.

I always wanted that to happen, so the last few tumultuous months before the vote were quite dizzying to live through.

I voted Yes. I was sure it was the right thing to do.

It was an article of faith on the Yes side that lots of citizens had journeyed from No to Yes, but no one ever headed in the opposite direction.

Well, more than two months after September 18th, I look around me at what the Yes movement has become. And I think I want out.

It all seemed so positive at…

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Neil McInroy – Power to the local economy

“I can’t myself raise the winds that might blow us or this ship into a better world. But I can at least put up the sail so that when the winds comes, I can catch it” E.F. Schumacher

‘Although we talk a lot these days about globalisation, about a world grown small, when you look at the economies of modern cities what you see is a process of localisation: a steadily rising share of the work force produces services that are sold only within that same metropolitan area.’   Professor Paul Krugman, Professor of Economics, Princeton University.

Local economies matter for a socially just and economically robust Scotland.  Despite a general rise in economic prosperity and a rising standard of living, Scotland is a land of haves and have-nots.  For too long some of Scotland’s communities have suffered from poverty and disadvantage.  A true progressive agenda, needs to tackle this.  A progressive future is about a Scottish economy which works for all of the Scotland’s communities and its people.  (more…)

Fay Young – Time to end the social injustice of the council tax freeze

 

Perhaps I should be grateful to John Swinney. Since 2007 Scotland’s Finance Secretary has spent £500 million on freezing council taxes. “By the end of the current Parliamentary term, [Band D] households will have saved £1,200 since the freeze was introduced in 2007.” So says the SNP press release which conveniently skates over the cost of this ‘saving’ and the cuts it has imposed on all local authorities.

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David Hume Institute – Measuring inequality in Scotland: a widening gap between the young and the old

“The main purpose of the housing market should be to provide accommodation, but it now also seems to be a mechanism that sustains and magnifies intergenerational inequality. This might be an issue that a new Scottish Parliament with enhanced tax powers might wish to address.” Professor David Bell (more…)

Max Cruickshank – Why you should sign the petition for votes for 16 and 17 year olds

What a momentous day I had last week sitting in the gallery of the Holyrood parliament listening to MSP after MSP, from EVERY political party, heap praise on the honesty, integrity, enthusiasm and sheer hard work that young people had applied to making their decision on how to use their votes for the first time in our independence referendum. (more…)